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Locations on 8 IU Campuses

Degree Requirements (120 cr.)

Undergraduate students who are admitted as degree-seeking students will be required to complete the campus-wide General Education program prior to graduation with a baccalaureate degree. 

The Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) degree requires a minimum of 120 hours. This includes 42-45 hours of general/supportive liberal arts courses and 52 credit hours in social work courses. The remainder of credits are completed through selection of electives and meeting general education requirements. The School of Social Work requirements sometimes overlap with the GenEd requirements for the IUSB campus.

Degree Map

All courses are 3 credit hours, unless otherwise specified.

General Education Curriculum

Visit the General Education website for a detailed description of the IU South Bend general-education curriculum, including lists of approved courses. All courses certified as meeting the campuswide general-education requirements are designated in the Schedule of Classes.

Campuswide Curriculum (33-37 cr.)

Fundamental Literacies (13-19 cr.)
  • Writing :: ENG-W 131 Reading, Writing, and Inquiry I
  • Critical Thinking
  • Oral Communication :: SPCH-S 121 Public Speaking
  • Visual Literacy :: select one of the following:
    • CJUS-P 424 Crime Mapping and Geographic Information Systems
    • CMLT-C 190 An Introduction to Film
    • CMLT-C 293 History of the Motion Picture I
    • ENG-W 315 Writing for the Web
    • ENG-W 367 Writing for Multiple Media
    • FINA-A 109 Ways of Seeing: Visual Literacy
    • INFO-I 310 Multimedia Arts and Technology
    • JOUR-J 210 Visual Communication
    • NURS-S 485 Professional Growth and Empowerment
    • THTR-T 228 Design for the Theatre
  • Quantitative Reasoning :: Select one of the following:
    • CJUS-K 300 Techniques of Data Analysis
    • MATH-M 111 Mathematics in the World
    • MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics
  • Information Literacy :: COAS-Q 110 Introduction to Information Literacy (1 cr.)
  • Computer Literacy :: select one of the following:
    • BUS-K 201 The Computer in Business
    • CSCI-A 106 Introduction to Computing
    • CSCI-A 107 Advanced Microcomputing (4 cr.)
    • CSCI-A 201 Introduction to Programming (4 cr.)
    • CSCI-C 101 Computer Programming I (4 cr.)
    • CSCI-C 201 Computer Programming II (4 cr.)
    • EDUC-W 200 Using Computers in Education
    • FINA-P 273 Computer Art and Design I
    • INFO-I 101 Introduction to Informatics (4 cr.)
    • INFO-I 210 Information Infrastructure I (4 cr.)
    • INFO-I 211 Information Infrastructure II (4 cr.)
    • MUS-T 120 Computer Skills for Musicians
Common Core Courses (12 cr.)

Complete one course from each of the following four areas, as designated in the Schedule of Classes. At least one of the areas must be completed at the 300-level.

  • The Natural World

    This core course introduces students to the methods and logic of science and helps students understand the importance of science to the development of civilization and to the contemporary world. It serves to provide a context within which to evaluate the important scientific and technological issues we face in modern society. Although all sections of The Natural World bear the same title, the content and specific focus of the course varies; each section has a specific subtitle that indicates its particular content and focus. Courses at the 100-level bear the designation N 190 (for instance, BIOL-N 190 The Natural World), and the 300-level Natural World courses appear in the Schedule of Classes as N 390 offerings in the specific disciplines.

    Select N 190 or N 390 from ANTH, AST, BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, GEOL, MATH, PHYS, or in any other field in which a course in this category may appear, as designated in the Schedule of Classes.

  • Human Behavior and Social Institutions

    This course introduces students to the distinctive perspectives the social sciences employ in building an understanding of our world. The course also focuses on the individual in relation to and as a product of that social world. It requires students to develop an appreciation of the processes of social interaction and emphasizes the analytic frameworks and techniques social scientists use to explain the causes and patterns of individual and institutional behavior. Although all sections of Human Behavior and Social Institutions bear the same title, the content and specific focus of the course varies; each section has a specific subtitle that indicates its particular content and focus. Courses at the 100-level bear the designation B 190 (for instance, SOC-B 190 Human Behavior and Social Institutions), and the 300-level Human Behavior and Social Institutions courses appear in the Schedule of Classes as B 399 offerings in the specific disciplines.

    Select B 190 or B 399 from ANTH, BUS, COGS, GEOG, POLS, PSY, SOC, SPCH, SUST, WGS, or any other field in which a course in this category may appear, as designated in the Schedule of Classes.

  • Literary and Intellectual Traditions

    The various versions of this course focus on a topic that can be addressed from more than one disciplinary perspective, and explores ways in which the principal disciplinary approach can be augmented and enriched by readings from other disciplines. Although all sections of Literary and Intellectual Traditions bear the same title, the content and specific focus of the course varies; each section has a specific subtitle that indicates its particular content and focus. Courses at the 100-level bear the designation T 190 (for instance, HIST-T 190 Literary and Intellectual Traditions), and the 300-level Literary and Intellectual Traditions courses appear in the Schedule of Classes as T 390 offerings in the specific disciplines.

    Select T 190 or T 390 from ENG, CMLT, FINA, FREN, GER, HIST, HPSC, JOUR, MUS, PHIL, PSY, SPAN, TEL, THTR, WGS or in any other field in which a course in this category may appear, as designated in the Schedule of Classes.

  • Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity :: 

    This course explores the human need to experience and comprehend the creative process. It encourages students to experience culture and cultural artifacts as makers, performers, and audiences. Students gain familiarity with the discipline and craft by which artists and performers achieve their characteristic effects, as well as the satisfaction inherent in that process. Versions of this course explore the role of art, music, theatre, and other artistic modes in the formation and expression of a particular culture and encourage respect for diverse cultures and the artifacts they produce. Although all sections of Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity bear the same title, the content and specific focus of the course varies. Each section has a specific subtitle that indicates its particular content and focus. Courses at the 100-level bear the designation A 190 (for instance, FINA-A 190 Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity), and the 300-level

    Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity courses appear in the Schedule of Classes as A 399 offerings in the specific disciplines.

    Select A 190 or A 399 from ANTH, CMLT, ENG, FINA, INMS, MUS, THTR, or in any other field in which a course in this category may appear, as designated in theSchedule of Classes.

Contemporary Social Values (8 cr.)
  • Students must complete one course from each of the following three areas, as designated in the Schedule of Classes.
  • Non-Western Cultures (3 cr.) ::
  • Diversity in United States Society (3 cr.) :: (sociology or psychology recommended)
  • Health and Wellness (2 cr.) :: 

Electives (18 cr.)

Social and Historical Studies (9 cr.)
  • HIST-H-106 American History II
  • POLS-Y 103 Introduction to American Politics
  • SOC-S 161 Principles of Sociology
Supportive Area Requirements (9 cr.)
  • PSY-P 103 General Psychology
  • Any Biology course
  • Any 300-level Psychology course

Required Courses (52 cr.)

  • SWK-S 102 Understanding Diversity in a Pluralistic Society
  • SWK-S 141 Introduction to Social Work
  • SWK-S 221 Human Growth and Development in the Social Environment
  • SWK-S 251 History and Analysis of Social Welfare Policy
  • SWK-S 322 Small Group Theory and Practice
  • SWK-S 331 Generalist Social Work Practice I: Theory and Skill
  • SWK-S 332 Generalist Social Work Practice II: Theory and Skill
  • SWK-S 352 Social Welfare Policy and Practice
  • SWK-S 371 Social Work Research
  • SWK-S 401 Integrative  Practicum Seminar I
  • SWK-S 402 Integrative Practicum Seminar II
  • SWK-S 423 Organizational Theory and Practice
  • SWK-S 433 Community Behavior and Practice within a Generalist Perspective
  • SWK-S 442 Practice-Policy Seminar in Fields of Practice
  • SWK-S 472 Practice Evaluation
  • SWK-S 481 Social Work Practicum I
  • SWK-S 482 Social Work Practicum II